Wild Atlantic Way B&B Ballyliffin

Inishowen 100Inishowen 100
The Inishowen 100 may sound like a Formula One race, but it gets its name from the approximate distance in miles of the sign - posted drive. Discover one of Ireland’s most beautiful regions the Inishowen Peninsula. You will be spoiled for choice for things to see and do in this very special part of the northwest region. Stunning natural and superb coastline, offer total escapism and solace from life's hectic pace. Simply immerse yourself in the inspiring culture and historical sites or try your hand at an exhilarating outdoor pursuit such as kayaking, mountaineering or surfing. World class golf endless white sandy beaches, traditional arts and crafts great food and lively entertainment and a warm welcome await’s you.

Malin HeadMalin Head
Malin Head, in County Donegal, is renowned for its rugged coastal landscape and attractive beaches. The area is steeped in history and folklore. Malin Head is an area for all tastes, including walking, fishing, swimming, photography, studying rock formations or rare flora and it is close to Inishowen’s splendid golf courses. Discover some of the largest sand dunes in Europe once you enter the Malin Head area via the coastal road, along the north of Trawbreaga Bay at Lagg.

Knockamany BensKnockamany Bens
Discover some of the largest sand dunes in Europe at the famous Five Finger Strand from Knockamany Bens. At low tide, see if you can spot the wreck of the Twilight, which sank in 1889 on its voyage to Derry. The circuit of the head will take you past the radio station, built in 1910, and round the coast to Banba’s Crown, the northern tip of Ireland. Here, a tall derelict building known locally as The Tower, was constructed in 1805 by the Admiralty and later used as a Lloyds signal station which served as a most important news link connecting America and Europe. From Banba's Crown, Inishtrahull Island and its nearly two hundred year old lighthouse can be seen to the north east and further out ot the east on a clear day you can see the Scottish Hills.

Pollan BayPollan Bay
Located on the north western tip of the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal.
Beautiful Pollan Bay can be found close to the village of Ballyliffin.The long stretch of sandy beach looks out onto Glashedy Island and is an ideal location for all types of water activities, particularly windsurfing.
Pollan Bay is highly popular with visitors and locals alike and is suitable for all ages with an eco-friendly children’s play area beside the beach and a Beach Walk that hugs the edge of the Ballyliffin Golf course and takes you to Carrickabraghey Castle in the beautiful Isle of Doagh. Binion Hill is also a designated walk that is accessible from Pollan Bay and is recommended for nature lovers and hill walkers

HillwalkingHill Walking
Clonmany is nestled amongst rolling hills which gives us numerous hill walks. On many of these walks you can view right over Inishowen and the Atlantic ocean. Maps can be obtained at the hotel reception to guide you smelly on your way.
The picture below is taken from the hill beside The Ballyliffin TownHouse. A packed lunch and time is all you will need.

Carrickabraghey CastleCarrickabraghey Castle, Isle of Doagh
On the extreme tip of the Isle at the very end of the road, facing the full force of the Atlantic on a raised rock is Carrickagraghey Castle.
The Isle of Doagh was once an Island but now is connected to land by road. Its form now is essentially that of a peninsula (with in peninsula).
Another link in O’Doherty’s defensive network, it resembles both Inch and Burt in construction. Built before 1600 it was occupied by Phelemy Brasleigh O’Doherty.
Because of its seclusion it was chosen by Cahir O’Doherty to plan his revoly.
From the loops of the remarkably complete castle, Pollan Strand, the locationof a vicious and bloody battle for the lordship of Inishowen in the sixteenth century, is visible.
It is thought that the original castle complex was more expansive than today stretching to where more modern building has taken place.

Mamore GapMamore Gap
Mamore Gap or the ‘great / principal outlet’ was once the sole gateway between Buncrana and Urris. This steep meandering road is sheltered 700 feet on either side by the hill of Mamore on the east and on the west the hill of Craogh Carragh. To the north east Raghtin More stands 1657 feet in the distance. These hills are only a small feature of glacier deposits and formations which are abundant in this area and other local imprints of the Ice Age date back to 15000 BC.
On the crest of Mamore Gap a number of holy relics are to be found. A holy well devoted to St Eigne and a small alter of statues are the centre point on the annual mass held here every August 15th in commemoration of the Pagan Times when locals had to practice their religion in secret to be protected from persecution.Descending from Mamore Gap offers panoramic views whether they be of the hills on one side or of the Atlantic Ocean on the other. Either way the sightseer will have to travel a considerable distance to see such magnificent views as these.

Straid Chapel
While the old church has very few marked graves, 'the graveyard is literally piled with heaps of the dead;
it is raised many feet in height, and seems to be wholly vaulted underneath'. (Memorials to the Dead Vol. 5, 1901).

This old chapel is situated on The Wild Atlantic Way as you leave the mamore gap and head to Ballyliffin.

Doagh Famine VillageDoagh Famine Village
Tells the story of a Donegal family and community living on the edge of Donegal and surviving from Famine times right up to the present day. A visit here also helps explain the road to peace in Northern Ireland, Ireland in the ‘Celtic Tiger’ years and the current economic collapse. This highly recommended attraction is located a 3km from Ballyliffin in north Inishowen.
Doagh Famine Village contains a wide selection of actual size attractions, including some original dwellings which were still inhabited up to 20 years ago.
In fact, the centre has been built around the home of the owner who lived here with his family until 1983. By then, living in a thatched cottage was no longer fashionable and today this building tell of the subsistence way of life on Doagh Island.

Tullagh Bay Equestrian Centre
Whether you are a complete novice at horse riding or are more experienced rider we have a range of lessons and activities to suit everyone.
The equestrian centre is located in Clonmany, Inishowen in the northeast of County Donegal. Outside of the centre, the location itself offers a great scenic setting for horse riding.
Situated near Tullagh Beach and the rolling Urris Hills we can offer some great treks and ride outs.
We offer the very best in training and facilities to make the most of your time in the saddle.
Trekking around the magnificent scenery around the equestrian centre is an adventurous and enjoyable activity to enjoy.
This part of Inishowen in northeast Donegal remains truly unspoiled.
With our superb horses, choice of quality accommodation and on-site facilities a day, weekend or week away trekking could be for you.
Explore the beauty of the beaches, bogs, mountains and surrounding countryside.
Our guides are friendly, knowledgeable and experienced and share in your passion for the horses and shared activities.